Georgia Public Records

The Georgia Open Records Act (GORA) provides definitions and exemptions for what constitutes public record as well as ensures that all public records are available for inspection and copying by 'citizens of the state' unless those records are specifically exempted by law.  Public Record in the state of Georgia consists of any and all media (documents, tapes, videos, books, recordings, emails) created by those in public office in the course of their public service, except those records whose release would hinder personal privacy or otherwise mislead the public (contractor’s estimates, etc) or endanger the operations of government or the corporations who must submit records.

A request to inspect or copy records may be made either orally or in writing. However a written request is recommended to eliminate any dispute as to what was requested or when the request was made.   Delivery and charges for these records will vary by agency.

Requests should be addressed to:

GORA Coordinator
Georgia Department of Community Affairs
60 Executive Park South
Atlanta, GA 30329

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Brief History of Georgia

Georgia was the last of the original Thirteen Colonies, the fourth state to ratify the United States Constitution, and was one of the original seven Confederate states that started the American Civil War. Georgia was also the last state to be restored to the Union. Georgia is also known as the Peach State and the Empire State of the South, and was named for King George II after the British gained control from the Spanish.

Early Georgian history consists of an indigenous peoples known as mound builders who disappeared in the mid to late 1500’s when the Spanish began exploring and settling the region.  Conflict between the Spanish and English for control over Georgia began in the mid-late 1600’s and continued through to the early 1700’s when the British (Carolinians and their Native American allies) forces pushed the Spanish resistance back down into Florida where they controlled only St Augustine and Pensacola.  This is despite the fact that the Spanish had established missions at Guale and Mocama nearly 100 years prior.

At the time, the British interest in the region was based mainly on the fact that Spanish Florida had become a haven for runaway slaves, much to the dismay of the British Carolinian slave-owners.  This combined with pressure from the Parliament to increase the British acknowledging population and productivity in order for the crown to increase their incoming revenue were the main causes for the struggle.  The Spanish had created a drain on the British asset supply (runaway slaves) and the Crown needed to build her empire.  The area that is now called Georgia was simply caught in the crosshairs.

The increase of white settlers that followed put pressure on the US Government to remove the Cherokee population to make room for their swelling numbers.  The dispute eventually led to the Indian Removal Act and the Trail of Tears, in which around 4000 Cherokees dies as they were forced to relocate on foot to Oklahoma.  This was after the US Supreme Court ruled AGAINST the redrawing of Indian Land Borders.

Georgia was also a major player in the American Civil War and many hard fought battles occurred within her borders.    Georgia was the last Confederate state to be restored to the Union after Reconstruction in 1870. 

The Early economy of Georgia consisted mainly of plantation farming, mainly cotton and food-stuffs.  In 1829 the first US gold rush occurred when gold was discovered in the Georgia Mountains.  Today there are 15 Fortune 500 companies and 26 Fortune 1000 companies with headquarters in Georgia, including such names as Home Depot, UPS, Coca Cola, Delta Air Lines, AFLAC, Southern Company, and SunTrust Banks.  Agricultural outputs consist of poultry and eggs, pecans, peaches, peanuts, rye, beef dairy and cattle, pork and hogs, turfgrass, tobacco, and vegetables. Industrial outputs include textiles and apparel, transportation equipment, cigarettes, processed foods, paper products, chemical products, electric equipment. Tourism also makes an important contribution to the economy. Georgia is home to the Granite Capital of the World (Elberton). Atlanta has been the site of enormous growth in real estate, service, and communications industries.

Fast Facts:

  • Capital City:
  • Biggest City:
  • Population:
  • State Bird:
  • State Flower:
  • State Tree:
  • Nickname:
  • Atlanta
  • Atlanta
  • ~9,685,744
  • Brown Thrasher
  • Cherokee Rose
  • Live Oak
  • Peach State

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Georgia Government Info

200 Piedmont Avenue SE, Suite 1604,
West Tower, Atlanta, Georgia 30334-9010
Phone: 404-656-2133
Fax: 404-463-5089

ATLANTA

244 Washington Street, SW
Suite 300
Atlanta, GA  30334
404.656.5171

MACON

110 Holiday North Drive
Macon, GA  31210
478.471.5315

19 Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr., S.W.
Atlanta, Georgia  30334
Tele: (404) 656-3645
Toll Free: (800) 282-5852

c/o Historic Sites Region Office
2600 Highway 155 SW, Suite D, Stockbridge, GA 30281
Telephone: 770.389.7265

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Office of the Attorney General
40 Capitol Square, SW
Atlanta, Ga 30334
Phone:  (404) 656-3300
Fax:  (404) 657-8733

Open Records Unit
Georgia Bureau of Investigation
3121 Panthersville Road
Decatur, Georgia 30034
Fax your request to 404-270-8529

PLEASE INCLUDE

  • Your full name
  • Your mailing address
  • Your contact telephone number (and fax number if available)
  • The names of the subjects or victims of the investigation or report
  • The Georgia county or city where the incident occurred
  • The date of the investigation or incident associated with your request

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Office of public Affairs:  414.656.0772
Georgia Board of Corrections:  404.656.6002
Georgia Dept. of Corrections and Parole Board’s Office of Victim Services:
404.651.6668
800.593.9474

INMATE SEARCH

Georgia Department of Corrections Facilities Listing

47 Trinity Avenue, Suite 501
Atlanta, GA 30334
(404) 656-3450

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Office of the Lieutenant Governor
Administrative Staff
240 State Capitol
Atlanta, GA  30334
TEL: (404) 656-5030
FAX: (404) 656-6739

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244 Washington Street
Room 572, State Office Annex Building
Atlanta, Georgia 30334
Phone: (404) 656-3470
FAX: (404) 656-2253

Clerk's Office: (404) 656-3470

State Agencies  FULL LIST

State Archives
http://www.sos.ga.gov/archives/

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Click for large Georgia county map.

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